Monday, January 31, 2011

Elementary math and Google Earth... a few starting points

Google EarthImage via WikipediaDecided to take a look at how teachers have been using Google Earth for elementary-level math lessons and came across some really useful instructional videos.

Here are two of them which we found easy to follow and useful.

Sunday, January 30, 2011

Texting, special education mentoring, and student mobility are some of the issues in this month's review of research and reports

A review of education reports, studies, and related research released in January 2011.

To Really Learn, Quit Studying and Take a Test
According to a recent research published online in the journal Science, taking a test is not just a passive mechanism for assessing how much people know, it can actually help people learn and works better than a number of other traditional studying techniques.

Science, January 20, 2011.

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Education & Digital Learning Current Awareness for January 23/11

A review of news and blog articles, commentaries, reports, and technology issues as they relate to education, digital learning, children and youth. Covering the last three weeks of 2011.

Friday, January 21, 2011

Curriculum, online resources, and freedom of speech...when the three meet in court

U.S. Supreme CourtImage via WikipediaThis past Tuesday the U.S. Supreme Court decided not to hear an appeal of a Massachusetts ruling on a school board's exclusion of web resources from a school curriculum guide regarding a long disputed genocide issue.

This case involves a curriculum guide released in 1999 as a response to a recently passed Massachusetts law which required the state board of education to develop recommendations on curricular material about genocide and human rights issues. The draft curriculum guide included a reference to the genocide of Armenians by the Ottoman Turkish empire in 1915 and following years, and this immediately generated a request from a Turkish cultural group to add references to the "contra-genocide perspective."

The rejected appeal upholds the August decision that Massachusetts education officials did not violate public school students’ free speech rights in 1999 when they excluded sources that questioned the Armenian genocide. The original decision basically uses a "library metaphor" to argue its position:
...the removal of "contra-genocide" perspectives because of pressure from the Armenian community did not violate the First Ammendment because the websites constituted an element of the state curriculum, and not a "virtual school library." In other words, striking the information from the class was ruled to be the equivalent of taking one book off the course's suggested reading list, rather than removing the book from that school's library all together. (Education Week)
For more reading on this case see:

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Education & Digital Learning Current Awareness for January 2/11

A review of news and blog articles, commentaries, research, reports, and technology issues as they relate to education, digital learning, children and youth. Covering the last two weeks of 2010.